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Month: January 2019

Reducing Amazon Connect Telephony Costs by 46% while Improving Caller Experience

The “Call Me” concept isn’t new but it’s low-hanging fruit that many don’t take advantage of. Using Amazon Connect, we’ll create a simple UI to improve the caller experience while saving 46% on our telephony costs (assuming we’re making US-destined calls with a US East/West instance) by diverting inbound toll-free calls to outbound DID calls. This is an extension of the “Placing Outbound Calls Using Amazon Connect API” post I did a couple months ago. That post should be your starting point if the code examples below aren’t lining up for you. The Benefits The result of a “Call Me” UI is a streamlined caller experience whereby the point of conversion (whether that’s a sale, lead, support request, or other) is merged with a “Call Me” experience that allows you to control the population they speak to and how they get to that population. Beyond the caller experience side (where they benefit from not having to repeat their issue multiple times, not losing their self-service history once they contact, etc), there’s a financial benefit (at least with Amazon Connect). As the Call Me experience is outbound and DID dialing, the costs per minute are ~46% lower than inbound toll-free dialing:…

Home Automation Dashboard – Version 3

Over the past two years, I’ve had a few iterations on my home dashboard project. All of the integrations for a “smart home” have been rather dumb in the sense that they’re just handling static transactions or act only as a new channel for taking actions. I wanted to change this and start bringing actual intelligence into my “smart” devices. A major problem in the current smart device landscape is the amount of proprietary software and devices that are suffocating innovation and stifling the convenience and luxury that a truly “smart home” can bring to consumers/homes of the future — this means improving my standard of living without effort, not just being a novelty device (a “smart” lightbulb that can be controlled through another novelty device like Amazon Alexa). In this vein, I’ve been connecting my devices (not just my smart devices) into a single product that enables devices to interact with each other without my intervention. This project has slowly morphed from a UI that simply displayed information and allowed on/off toggling to an actual dashboard that will take actions automatically. There’s not much special behind many of these actions at the moment but it’s a starting point. Home…

Lambda Data Dips within Amazon Connect Contact Flows

I’ve read many different guides on this but none seemed to provide end-to-end guidance or were cluttered with other noise unrelated to Lambda or Connect. The power of Lambda function inclusion in the contact flow is immense – perform security functions, lookup/validate/store data, lookup customer data for CRM integration, etc. While learning this, I created a simple Lambda function to simply multiply the caller’s input by 10, store both numbers, and return the output to the caller – I’ll dive into querying Dynamo databases in the near future. What we’re doing Using Amazon Connect and AWS Lambda, we’ll create a phone number which accepts a user’s DTMF input, multiplies it by 10, saves the results as contact attributes, and regurgitates those numbers to the caller. The final experience can be had by callingĀ +1 316-243-9079. Step 1-Create your Lambda Function Visit the Lambda console and select “Create Function”. For this example, I’m going to use the following details: Name: “FKLambdaDataDip” Runtime: Node.js 8.10 Rule: Create a custom role (and use the default values on the subsequent popup) Step 2-Creating the Resource Policy Now that the Lambda function exists, copy the ARN from the top right of the page: Using the AWS…