Press "Enter" to skip to content

Month: November 2018

Placing Outbound Calls Using Amazon Connect API & PHP

Amazon Connect is the AWS answer to costly contact center telephony platforms. There’s no upfront costs and overall usage is EXTREMELY cheap when compared to legacy telephony platforms – you essentially just pay per minute. I wanted to play with this a bit so I setup an instance and created a simple script to place outbound calls which will allow the call recipient to choose from hearing Abbott and Costello’s famous “Who’s on first?” bit or running their call through a sample Lambda script to identify their state (call 1-571-327-3066 for a demo, minus the outbound experience). Real-world use cases for this could automating calls to remind customers of upcoming appointments, notifying a group of an emergency situation, creating a “Don’t call us, we’ll call you!” customer service setup (so that you don’t have to expose your company’s phone number), scheduling wake-up calls, etc. What we’re doing Using Amazon Connect, we’ll: Configure our instance for application integration Create a sample contact flow with basic IVR and Lambda integration Use the Connect API to place a phone call (with PHP) This assumes you already have your Amazon Connect instance setup with a single number claimed. If not, this takes ~5 minutes…

Consuming RTSP Stream and Saving to AWS S3

I wanted to stream and record my home security cameras to the cloud for three reasons: 1) if the NVR is stolen, I’ll have the footage stored remotely, 2) (more realistically) I want to increase the storage availability without having to add hard drives, and 3) I want to increase the ease-of-access for my recordings. There are a number of services that do this for you (such as Wowza) and you can also purchase systems that do this out-of-the-box. The downside to services like Wowza is cost — at least $50/month for a single channel streaming without any recording – and the out-of-the-box solutions are expensive and run on proprietary platforms that limit your use and access…plus it’s more fun to do it yourself and learn something. The solution I arrived at was to use AWS Lightsail and S3. This gives me the low cost, ease of scale, and accessibility I desire. Due primarily to the transfer rate limits, Lightsail will only work for small, home setups but you could “upgrade” from Lightsail to EC2 to mitigate that. After all, Lightsail is just a pretty UI that takes away all the manual config work needed to setup an EC2 instance…

Using AWS Rekognition to Detect Text in Images with PHP

A couple years ago, I tinkered with a solution to use a webcam to capture images of receipts, covert the images to raw text, and store in a database. My scrappy solution worked okay but it lacked the accuracy to make it viable for anything real-world. With AWS Rekognition launching since then, I figured I’d try it out and see how it compares. I used a fake receipt to see how it’d do. Like every other AWS product I’ve used, it was incredibly easy to work it. I’ll share the simple script I used at the bottom of this post but, needless to say, there’s not much to it. While use was a breeze, the results were disappointing. Primarily, the fact that Rekognition is limited to ONLY 50 words in an image. So clearly it’s not a full-on OCR tool. Somewhat more disappointing was the limited range of confidence scores Rekognition returned (for each text detection, it provides a confidence score). The overall output was pretty accurate but not accurate enough for me to consider it “wow” worthy. Despite this, all of the confidence scores were above 93%. To be considered an OCR service, AWS Rekognition has a long way…